Destiny’s Children: A Saga of Early California

Published Date : October 9, 2009

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: English

Overview

In Destiny’s Children, historian Roger Herst delivers a novel uniting east and west through the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad and the convergence of two dramatically dissimilar families. Manchu artillery deserter Wong Po-ching survives execution, escapes to America, and makes his way to California’s Sierra Nevada, where he finds work on the Central Pacific Railroad. Irishman Theo Gallager, superintendent of construction, is a proud man who eschews authority. As a result of their mutual success laying track through the tortuous granite of the high Sierra, the two men are awarded join ownership of a previously worked gold mine and become reluctant partners. Harriet Horn, a transplanted Boston Brahman, and Theo come to Wong’s aid, eventually marry, then along with Wong and his new Chinese wife, form a lasting family bond. Throughout this novel readers are introduced to larger-than-life historical figures, including Leland Stanford and Mark Twain. Scorned immigrants during this hostile era survive to charter a new chapter in California’s destiny.

 

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Customer Reviews

A Kiss for Rabbi Gabrille is one of the best books I've read, and I've read hundreds. The suspense mounted and carried you right through the book.


- Len

One finishes Destiny's Children with perhaps fiction's greatest reward, a lasting permanent understanding and appreciation of this period and location in America's ultimate unification.

- Kent

Destiny's Children's three main characters are immensely likable, and the challenges that they face are extraordinary and engaging. .


- Stephen

Roger Herst, a rabbi and a previously published and accomplished novelist, really knows about Jewish congregations, rabbinical politics, women's issues, and how to tell a great story.

- Bader

Mr. Herst has created a strong, intelligent, yet vulnerable character in Rabbi Gabby Lewyn. His insights into the politics and intrigues of a synagogue were of special interest to me.

- Mary